Effects of Population Growth on Urban Infrastructure and Services: A Case of Eastleigh Neighborhood Nairobi, Kenya
Gilbert W. N. Asoka, Aggrey D.M. Thuo, Martin M. Bunyasi
Journal of Anthropology & Archaeology, 1(1), pp. 41-56.

Abstract
There is an increasing recognition that the growth of cities is inevitable and the solution to urban problems depends heavily on effective urban planning, infrastructure development and management. Rapid and often unplanned population growth is often associated with population demands that outstrip infrastructure and service capacity and leading to environmental degradation. This study, therefore sought to put into perspective impacts of population growth on infrastructure and service provision in Eastleigh neighbourhood. Its main themes were first, to understand trends in population growth; secondly, to understand the impact of population growth on infrastructure and services; thirdly, to explore available initiatives and their effectiveness in guaranteeing sustainable infrastructure and effective services in the neighborhood. The study interviewed 30 households, 20 businesses and 3 institutions in infrastructure development and service delivery. For households, simple random sampling technique was adopted while for institutions and businesses a purposive technique was utilized. The data was analysed with the aid of computer packages SPSS and Microsoft Excel programs. The packages generated outputs that were illustrated using percentages and bar graphs.

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Asoka, W. N. Gilbert., Thuo, D.M. Aggrey., Bunyasi, M. Martin. (2013). Effects of Population Growth on Urban Infrastructure and Services: A Case of Eastleigh Neighborhood Nairobi, Kenya. Journal of Anthropology & Archaeology, 1(1), pp. 41-56.

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Gilbert W.N. Asoka is a Part- time lecturer in the department of public health at Mount Kenya University. His career spans both in sociology and economics. With Sociology and economics Gilbert developed a keen interest in social research and teaching on HIV/AIDS, water and sanitation and environmental conservation. In 2010 Gilbert returned to Kenyatta University to pursue a MSC degree in Environmental Planning and Management with a focus on the impact of population growth on infrastructure and services in Nairobi. He has published three articles in environmental conservation and wildlife management.

Aggrey D.M. Thuo
Department of Land Resources Planning and Management
Jomo Kenyatta, University of Agriculture and Technology
P.O Box 62000-00200
Nairobi, Kenya

Martin M. Bunyasi
Department of Environmental Planning and Management
Kenyatta University, P.O Box 43844-00100
Nairobi, Kenya

Corresponding Author
Gilbert W. N. Asoka
Department of Environmental Planning and Management
Kenyatta University, P.O Box 43844-00100
Nairobi, Kenya
Email: nyalienyagilbert@gmail.com
Tel: +254 721 450 410